Café Crawl in Barrio Brasil

Tranquil and timeless, colorful and calm: welcome to Barrio Brasil. Perhaps you found yourself thinking this as you strolled through the Santiago neighbourhood on some weekend, taking in the bright and endless display of street art that covers crumbling 19th century mansions. Barrio Brasil is also home to an up-and-coming art scene, and there’s always a chance you may stumble upon an underground punk music festival in full swing behind a graffiti-covered door.

 Cafe Mozaika. Photo by Isabel March
Cafe Mozaika. Photo by Isabel March

Restaurants, bars, and clubs are also part of the Barrio Brasil landscape, and options range from fine dining to tiny empanada stands. But the bustling barrio is good for a more relaxed sit-down over coffee and snacks too, with several good cafes dotting the streets. Check out these cafes to see what the locals are loving, and take a break from your wandering at these places.

Café Forastero

Step in and the words “Bienvenido forastero” [welcome stranger] greet you from their position on the back wall.

Cafe Forastero. Photo by Isabel March
Cafe Forastero. Photo by Isabel March
To all those who see the unassuming façade and wander in, Café Forastero welcomes them with a cozy and simple interior—wooden floors are crowded with small tables and warm lights illuminate the clean, white walls—and the smell of fresh coffee and muffins. The meeting place of locals, students, and foreigners alike, this small café is a favorite in the barrio.

For something fresh, sip a limonada con menta (a fresh lemonade with mint) or leche con plátano , a frothy and rich blend of bananas and milk. If it’s a cool day, try the bittersweet chocolate caliente (hot coco) or the always-fresh coffee, prepared with hand-operated brewers. For snacks, you couldn’t go wrong with a creamy cheesecake or warm chocolate chip muffin, but also sample their focus-group tested bagel sandwiches, which are a crowd favorite. All drinks and pastries cost between CP$2,000 to $3,000 (USD$3.00 to $4.51), and bagels cost about CP$4,000.

Cafe Forastero
Barrio Brasil
Av. Ricardo Cumming 54
+56 9 7799 9115
Metro stop República
http://cafeforastero.cl/blog/

Café Mozaika

Low lights and chocolate brown colors, cushioned chairs and intimate gatherings: Café Mozaika is all about retreating from the world that bustles outside.

Cafe Mozaika. Photo by Isabel March
Cafe Mozaika. Photo by Isabel March

If the calming decor wasn’t enough, owner Juan Enrique Echeverría went a step further by removing wifi from the café after he noticed the lack of human communication due to smartphones and laptops. Now Café Mozaika is a family run business where regulars from the barrio stop by and chat with the friendly barista, and human interaction is highly valued. Expect to relax, talk, and reflect in this cozy spot.

Sample their most popular item, the café mozaike , which is a mix of warm coffee, milk, and dulce de leche. The pastries, made on site, are also tempting—the kuchen con nueces (a walnut-filled pastry) is a gooey treat. And if you have a sweet tooth, you will find a great selection here, with sweet drinks ranging from café helados to café frappés topped with rich whipped cream and cookies. All prices range from CP$1,000 to $3,000.

Café Mozaika
Barrio Brasil
Av. Ricardo Cumming 380
+56 9 7548 7168
Metro stop Cumming
https://www.facebook.com/Caf%C3%A9-Mozaiko-221412684654439/

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